Real estate trends occur for many reasons. The economy is often a factor, but other influences determine changes in demographics. The steady increase of women choosing career over family, combined with fewer couples marrying — or staying married — has led to a rising trend of single women buying homes.
The National Association of Realtors recently published statistics showing that single women account for 23% of first-time home buyers. That’s significant growth in a category that has slowly but steadily risen since the late 1990s. In contrast, single men make up just 15% of first-time home buyers.
What about repeat buyers, you ask? The numbers remain in line. Single women comprise 15%, while single men account for just 8% of second time (or more) home purchases.
With divorces and the overall slowdown of marriages leaving more single adults in the market for housing, it’s easy to see why single women are buying more homes on their own than ever before. Back in the ’90s, 52% of first-time buyers were married couples. Today that number is just 40%.
These statistics reflect my client base. It is very common for divorced or single women to contact me about buying a home. Some have children and some do not. What they don’t have is a spouse.
As this demographic grows, it presents more opportunities for me to help these women make smart financial choices about their mortgages. I love helping them understand the process and make good decisions for themselves, their finances, and their future.
If you know a single woman who is tired of renting or is divorcing and wants to know their options for buying a home, please have them get in touch with me for a consultation. I would be more than happy to answer their questions.

September’s Home Improver

Get Your Mind Into the Gutter

The fall is unforgiving when it comes to clogged gutters. If you haven’t already cleaned them out in the past few weeks, you should take care of it as soon as you are able. Leaves will be falling before you know it and if your gutters are already clogged, you may experience some unexpected damage to your home.
Here’s why:
Your gutters and downspouts control the flow of rainwater around your home. When they are clogged, the excess water has nowhere to go. This often causes the exterior of your home to decay prematurely and the cost for repair is typically much larger than the cost to pay a professional to clear your gutters. Notice more mosquitoes around the house than usual? Standing water in your gutters is a literal breeding ground for those pests.
You may think that the summer doesn’t add leaves so the gutters are probably fine. However, soil accumulated from the winter and spring can cause weeds to grow and thrive in the gutter and downspouts, causing heavy blockages even before the first fall leaves begin to change colors.
If you think you’ve got nothing to worry about because there aren’t many trees in your area, think again–especially if you happen to own a house with asphalt shingles. The granules in the shingles fall away during harsh weather and make their way into gutters and downspouts. Remember that brief but battering August hailstorm? That may have triggered an asphalt granule mini avalanche.
For all of these reasons, it is well worth taking the time to have your gutters thoroughly inspected and cleaned.