Debt is a four-letter word. Many people won’t talk about it, much less take it on, but you may be surprised to know that debt can be a good thing.
Millennials hate debt, probably because they are drowning in it, primarily from high college loans, auto loans and high-interest credit cards. The debt they have amassed at a young age has kept them from buying homes. Instead they’re opting to rent or just live with mom and dad longer than expected, which is leading to a later start on marriage and family.
Debt is not exclusively generational; it’s cultural, too. Many people who come to the United States are surprised by the “debt culture” here. They tend to avoid debt at all possible costs. Many immigrant families don’t use credit or debit cards. Everything is paid in cash. They rent, save money efficiently and pay everything off quickly. A loan? That’s another four-letter word they avoid.
But there is a difference between “good” and “bad” debt. Anything that depreciates over time is considered bad debt. An auto loan, for example, may be necessary, but your car will be worth much less than what you paid for it at the end of the loan. A home loan, on the other hand, is an investment. A manageable mortgage will leave you with a higher property value on the day of your final mortgage payment. Because property values always increase over time, real estate is one of the safest investments you can make.
Mortgages allow for the redistribution of financial assets over time. They free up cash to pay for those life events that cause those poor young Millennials to struggle in the first place. With interest rates at just under 4%, a home loan is the cheapest money you can borrow.
When it comes to debt, it’s all about perception. Knowing the difference between good and bad debt is a start. I can help you or your children find the right mortgage that will begin what may be the most important investment of their lives.

Please get in touch and I’ll be happy to help guide you through the process and answer your questions. I look forward to helping you.

November’s Home Improver

Tips to Keep Your Home Out of Probate

Guest Article by Lauren E Miller, Esq.

You may have heard stories before of homes that are “stuck” in probate. But what does this mean? What is probate, and should you avoid it? If you are interested in learning the answers to these questions, then read on!
Probate property is any property that is held in your sole name at death. After you pass away, probate is the process through which your assets are transferred to your named beneficiaries (if you have a will) or to your heirs (if you pass away without a will). In the case of your home, the way it is titled on your deed determines whether or not your home is a probate asset.
So what are some examples of ways to title your home that will not avoid probate?
1. Your sole name. If your deed has your name only, and you pass away, your home becomes a probate asset.
2. Multiple names as tenants in common. Unlike “joint tenants,”ownership as “tenants in common”does not include the right of survivorship. For example, let’s say that you and your sibling have equal ownership in a home that you inherited from your parents, as tenants in common. If you die, your fifty percent share will go to your beneficiaries or heirs, and not to your sibling. This means that your 50% share must go through probate.
Here are some ways to title your home that will avoid probate:
1. Joint tenants with right of survivorship. This title allows a property to pass directly to the other person(s) named on the deed.
2. Tenants by the entirety. This type of ownership functions similarly to joint tenants, but is a special title only allowed for married couples. Tenants by the entirety ownership also takes advantage of certain asset protection rules created specifically for married couples.
3. Title in the name of a trust. The are various types of trusts, many of which allow your assets to bypass the probate process.  If your title is in the name of the trustee of your trust, your home can avoid the probate process. Please note: simply having a trust does NOT mean that your house will avoid probate, your house must be placed into the trust before you pass away. If you have questions regarding a specific trust, please consult an attorney.
Okay, so now you know ways to title your home to avoid probate, but why should you care?  Probate is a long and costly process. Most probates in Massachusetts take a minimum of one year. Any assets that must go through probate are inaccessible to the heirs or beneficiaries for months after you have passed away, and real estate cannot be sold right away either.
Now that you understand the basics of how probate works for real estate, ask yourself: Is my home titled to avoid probate?
If you have questions regarding keeping your home out of probate, please contact Lauren E. Miller, Esq., of Ladimer Law Office, PC at (508) 620-4565 or at lmiller@ladimerlaw.com.