In the past, many divorced women have paid Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) on FHA loans to secure a mortgage that insures against a default in payment. This is required if your downpayment is less than 20% of the appraised value or sale price. It’s understandable, particularly if owning a home on your own is new for you. Mortgage insurance (MI) is also a requirement for non-FHA loans when your downpayment is under 20%. Keep in mind, that over the length of a mortgage, this insurance can cost you thousands of dollars. You may want to avoid it completely, if possible. Here’s why:
1. You can’t deduct it anymore. In the past, homeowners could deduct PMI from their taxes, but as of 2014, the new tax law no longer allows this deduction. That puts you on the hook for every dollar of PMI you pay.
2. It lessens your ability to get a future loan. PMI built into a mortgage works against the income you have to pay the loan. For example, if you pay $200 monthly for PMI, your income is worth $200 less because it’s tied to PMI rather than free for you to use for paying off other debts.
3. It slows down your payment timeline. Over time, the PMI you pay increases the length of your mortgage because of the monthly charge that’s factored into the payment.
If you pay MI, it can be eliminated. You don’t have to pay MI forever. After you have built a solid amount of equity in your home, you can stop paying your premium. This occurs at 78% loan to value.
Avoid PMI and MI pitfalls by working with me to find the best solutions that work for you. If you currently pay PMI or MI, this may be a good time to look at refinancing. Just because you agreed to your mortgage, it doesn’t mean it can’t be reworked to save you money in the long run. Get in touch at 617-965-1236. I look forward to your call.

The Spooky Truth About Candy Corn

Why is candy corn still available and why do people buy it? No one ever craves candy corn. When you think about it, trick-or-treaters come home with sacks full of various delicious candies, yet no one ever claims dibs on the candy corn. Baby Ruth, Almond Joy, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and other delightful treats are all consumed long before anyone dips a hand in the bowl of candy corn.
Maybe it’s because it looks more like a bowl of rotten teeth than the Indian corn it’s supposed to mimic. Whatever it is, over 25 million pounds of the sugary stuff are sold annually.
Originally known as “Chicken Feed,” when it was first introduced in the 1880s, the product we know today as candy corn made its debut in 1900. The scary thing? The recipe hasn’t changed a bit in over more than a century. Candy corn is made of sugar, water, corn syrup, marshmallow, confectioner’s wax and artificial colors. Very sweet indeed. But at 3.57 per calories per piece, they’re no worse than a bowl of cereal or a peanut butter ann jelly sandwich when it comes to causing cavities. Just remember to brush after eating!