When it comes to selecting the length of your mortgage, certain factors apply. There are some misconceptions about length due to age and income that don’t necessarily apply. Let’s bust some myths about mortgage term lengths.

Myth No. 1: A 15-year mortgage is always better than a 30-year mortgage. False. When you’re younger, you should expect your income to increase over time. If you have kids and enough money to afford paying down your principle quickly, then take on that 15-year mortgage — especially if you plan to tackle another major financial obligation: your children’s college tuition. On the other hand, as you move closer to retirement age, your income will probably level off or decline. In this case, playing it safe makes the most sense. Go with a 30-year mortgage with payments that you can make comfortably over time.

Myth No. 2: People over age 60 will not be approved for 30-year mortgages based on the fact that they could die before the mortgage is paid off. Yikes! Not true. A borrower’s age is never a consideration, thanks to the Equal Credit Opportunity Act. This is a protected category and is not to be considered during the application process. Your loan is determined by your income, savings, assets and credit history.

Myth No. 3: A 15-year mortgage will lower your monthly payment. Complete myth. While you will pay less interest over time, your monthly payment will be higher due to the fact that more of it goes to the principle reduction. If you are newly divorced or single, you’re working with only one income. A 30-year mortgage may work better for you in the long run.

Making these decisions can be difficult. There are so many factors to consider. The best thing you can do before making such a significant financial commitment is to call me at 617-965-1236. We’ll discuss all of your options so that you can make an informed decision that makes sense for you. I look forward to your call.

DIY Winterizing Tips

Stay warm and safe with these do-it-yourself fixes.

Although winter doesn’t officially arrive until next week, freezing cold temperatures have been invading New England for weeks. If you’re feeling a chilly draft or just want to prepare for when it gets reallycold in the next month or so, follow these easy, inexpensive ideas to keep the cold outside and the warmth inside.

1. Buy or make a door snake. Remember when you were a kid and your parents had a stuffed snake that you couldn’t play with because it was keeping the cold out? You can still find them. If you know how to crochet or know someone who does, a door snake will block out drafts for the price of a skein of yarn.

2. Switch the direction of your ceiling fans. Ever wonder why your ceiling fan moves in either direction? It’s not a lefty-righty thing. Because hot air rises, the ceiling fan should run in reverse (clockwise) at a low speed during the winter. This will cycle the warm air back down from the ceiling to where you are.

3. Seal gaps in windows. If you have old drafty windows, you should expect a big heating bill if you do nothing about it. Finding and caulking the gaps will accomplish two things: It prevents cold air from seeping in, but it also avoids wood rot by keeping moisture out. Here’s a tutorial.

4. Buy, test or replace your detectors. Your home needs both smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors to keep you safe this winter. Replacing batteries may not be enough, as typical detectors have a reliably functioning lifespan of only 6-8 years. If you’re buying a new detector, write the date on the inside of it so you’ll know when to purchase a new one. If you suspect your detectors are older than what is recommended, you owe it to yourself and your family’s well-being to replace them immediately.